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Please indicate the city where you think Fooz! will stick the most. As you all mentioned already logistics, please bear in mind that delivery will be short range (60 miles away from the city's outskirt). Consider also factors such as: 
-Culture
-Difficulty of delivery
-Presence of Farms around a city (variety, quality, etc...)
-Your strong need for Fooz! :-)

Order comments by:
Petr Supertramp | Posted 9 months ago

I recommend you to try Prague.
Food culture is on the rise - you can help to start it up
Delivery is easy in Prague, everything is close in Czech Rep
There are few online food delivery platforms in Prague, but we need more!

sergio tunno | Posted 9 months ago

What about extra-virgin olive oil in Prague?

Petr Supertramp | Posted 9 months ago

There are few places with true Italian experience (http://www.winemarket.cz/, http://www.uitala.cz/u-itala-produkty/) but I dont think that is enough. Czech people really love quality products if they are sold right

Alexander Nakonechny | Posted 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Agree with the InSomnius.
I can suggest Czech Republic (Prague). Visiting farmer's markets is incredibly popular, it becomes like part of the culture and its because of 3 points: 1. Just lack of quality agricaltural products on market - much is exorting to another countries. 2. Growing popularity of healthy, vegan food, sport, bio products. 3. More and more people buy food online.

Pavel Karfík | Posted 9 months, 4 weeks ago

Why don't you let the ship the product from the farmer's venue? That way you can connect vendors anywhere and reach a global market, are you really ready to handle logistics from all kinds of vendors to multiple cities?

A project I once co-developed has been solving a very similar issue, but hasn't been decentralized, vendors were in charge of their sales and shipping, it was the search, the payment and large selection of products that made our project work.

sergio tunno | Posted 9 months, 3 weeks ago

The way we will launch the platform, in fact, will be the model you described. It's easier and will help us identify the cities where the majority of our customers will be. We want to launch it with one specific product, to start with, extra-virgin olive oil, leaving to each farmer the shipment. We just have an agreement with the courier to pick up the pack. In this way, we'll have no need for the storage. This works with nonperishable produce. When it will come to the whole range of produce shipped by farmers, we will need to select a city, create the logistics around that one, and once it works, move on to the next one. What about your project, Pavel, can you share more details?

Pavel Karfík | Posted 7 months, 1 week ago

@sergio our project has been dying ever since, somehow the team I was working with fell apart, the site is still running and theoretically collecting users, see it for yourself, maybe you'll find some inspiration in it... https://www.lokaleat.com/en/

We did a lot of work, but when we started figuring out the real users, we didn't do what was needed, an experience for sure, although if it was my product I think there's a lot to do with it, we were just getting started.

Can't find the link, but came around a similar project recently that handles the logistics using existing shops, collects the orders from all users in a limited time and note that they can pickup their products as a single package at a local vendor they got partnered with.
This lowers the expenses for logistics and makes use of an existing and known place to pick up the order.

We were also thinking about pop-up stands with on local farmer's markets as a marketing strategy to promote the site since it's also a great place where to connect more local producers and vendors.

Дмитрий Сомали | Posted 10 months ago

in Russia this idea will not be successful.

sergio tunno | Posted 10 months ago

Interesting, why is that?

Дмитрий Сомали | Posted 10 months ago

Very high corruption and the relationship between agriculture and officials. Very much depends on their decision ...

Next Houl | Posted 10 months ago

After reading about what Fooz exactly does, I am perplexed on the need to have such a platform for Farmer's market.
From my experience, I can say that the places which already have a inclination for Farmer's markets; pretty much already have an existing market. What does the Fooz bring new to the existing milieu.

Secondly, will you be assisting or replacing the existing infrastructure that these local communities have.

There is definitely a lot of scope for growth in the cities in which such a concept does not exist. Any city with a fairly good farming industry already has a supply for the foods. So most of the 3rd world can be excluded right of the back.

Any place which has a 1st world status, spare GDP to spend on the fresh vegetables sounds like an ideal place for such a business. But again.. There are so many of those. Pick one that has got money to spare, no time to spare, inclination for fancy food and awareness for the healthy apatite and start the business.

Mandar Karhade | Posted 10 months ago

Hit the nail at the end !
"Any place which has a 1st world status, spare GDP to spend on the fresh vegetables sounds like an ideal place for such a business. But again.. There are so many of those. Pick one that has got money to spare, no time to spare, inclination for fancy food and awareness for the healthy apatite and start the business."

Lol you could have spared first all things. This is the gist!

Next Houl | Posted 10 months, 1 week ago

What is fooz? Can you add that in the description?

Ethan Clime | Posted 10 months ago

If you click the name Fooz as the title, it goes to the project page where you can read all about the business. It also includes links to the website. Maybe a good idea we incorporate a description popup for people on the newsfeed (home link) to read right before answering. Cheers for asking.

sergio tunno | Posted 10 months ago

That's actually a good point, Ethan. Looking forward to such a feature.

Next Houl | Posted 10 months ago

thanx for pointing that out. I was so confused on how should I be finding information. But its a best practice to keep relevant information fairly quickly accessible.

InSomnius Joe | Posted 10 months, 1 week ago

From my personal experience in terms of Culture, logistics (User's and yours) and people's mindset about Food I would say:
- Berlin, Copenhagen, Vienna, Stuttgart and Munich.

Reason 1: Many people -especially Germans - (as you can see most cities are German) in these cities are conscious about what they eat and where it comes from - with more emphasis on the latter.
Reason 2: They have the money to spend and already spend it on food. Just look at a huge rise of Al Natura and other Organic supermarkets.
Reason 3: Big cities, it's hard to get access to really good quality food without expensive middle men
Reason 4: Time - Busy cities have busy people

Special Reason for Denmark: It is hard to get good quality food but people also greatly care about the environment, food waste, etc. There are even many laws that eg/ force supermarkets to be small, reduce packaging to the minimum, no "buy 1 get 1 free offers, etc. It's all to reduce waste and enviromental impact so the people there are ripe to get some great and sustainable food. :)

So Copenhagen and Berlin are my top choices :).


Unf. where I live right now you would prob. not succeed unless the price is also good. - Prague

sergio tunno | Posted 10 months ago

Thanks! Very good insights :)

Sebastian Grossmayer | Posted 10 months, 1 week ago

In my opinion Munich, Milan and Vienna are suitable cities. They all are bigger which means that there are consumers for local groceries. Furthermore the above mentioned cities have farms near the city outskirts which makes logistics easier.

One idea: How about just delivering the groceries from farmer's markets or bio grocery stores to customer's? Like Foodora for local groceries ;)

sergio tunno | Posted 10 months ago

Hi Sebastian, the Foodora of local groceries is actually a good point. In fact, some of our first farmers will be those that have already an online presence and sell already directly. I believe it's in their interest to utilize such a service not to have to focus on direct sales. Great point, indeed! ;)

Kewagi Guiscard | Posted 10 months, 1 week ago

I'm not sure how big your chances are in my city, but let me give you the rundown:

People in Vienna (Austria) are mostly well informed about and interested in organic foods. Fooz would have to compete with a few farmers' markets, organic supermarkets and established delivery services for organic produce. The city borders one of the most important agricultural regions of the country called Marchfeld, to which it is well connected via roads and a train network, so delivery should not be much of a problem.

sergio tunno | Posted 10 months, 1 week ago

Competition is a good point. Is it better to enter a market where there's already high, established demand with several competitors, or a place with little competition and a rising demand? Responding to your point, I think we could get to Vienna only when we will have a well-greased machinery, so we can compete.